We support the following modifiers through our search so that you can find what you’re looking for through quick specifications.

  1. Term
  2. “Query”
  3. -Query or Not
  4. AND
  5. OR
  6. Grouping AND and OR
  7. Type
  8. Before
  9. After
  10. Near

We can take a more in-depth look at each to see how to use them.

1. Term - Search any word or group of words as separate items

How it works: Add any word or group of words to find them across file content and metadata.

Example: Stock purchase consulting will search for documents that have all of those terms. This type of search works like an AND search. It finds documents that have 'stock' AND 'purchase' AND 'consulting'

2.  “Query” - Exact Match Search

How it works
: Add quotation marks to your query to search for an exact match

Example: Searching for “limited to user information and data relating to user activities” will find all documents with that phrase in their content.


3.  -Query or NOT - Does not contain query

How it works: Use a subtract modifier to exclude a term from your search.

Example: Stock purchase -payoff will search for all documents that contain 'stock' AND 'purchase' NOT 'payoff'.

Note: Manually adding ‘NOT’ will also achieve the same results and will exclude all terms listed after the modifier from your search. 

4.  AND - Search for terms together

How it works: Use AND to specify searching for terms together during your search. If you search for multiple terms without including AND the search will automatically default to AND .

Example: Stock AND purchase will search for all documents that contain ‘'stock' AND 'purchase'

5.  OR: Search for non-exclusive terms

How it works: Use OR to specify terms that aren’t mutually exclusive

Example: Stock OR purchase will search for all documents that contain ‘'stock' OR 'purchase'

6.  Grouping AND and OR

How it works:
Use AND and OR with parentheses to use both functions

Example:
StockAND(performance OR purchase) will search for all documents that contain ‘'stock' AND ‘performance’ OR ‘stock’ AND 'purchase'

Note: You will see your boolean operators underlined in green . When bad query syntax is provided the text will be underlined in red .

7.  Type - Specify file extension or file type

How it works: Use the type: modifier to specify a file extension or file type you’re looking for.

Example: Stock purchase type:pdf will search for all documents that contain stock and purchase that are PDFs.


8.  Before - Find files before a certain date

How it works: Use the before: modifier with the following format before:YYYY-MM-DD to specify files created before that date

Example: Searching for stock purchase before:2019-01-01 will find all documents that contain the words stock and purchase that were created before January 1st, 2019.


9. After - Find files after a certain date

How it works: Use the after: modifier with the following format after:YYYY-MM-DD to specify files created after that date.

Example: Searching for stock purchase after:2019-01-01 will find all documents that contain the words 'stock' AND 'purchase' that were created after January 1st, 2019.

10. Near - Use proximity search to find words within a certain distance

How it works: Use the near: modifier with the following format near:word1,distance,word2 (no spaces) to specify a search for two words within a certain number of words

Example: Searching for near:stock,3,agreement will find all documents that contain the words stock and agreement within three words. e.g. will find stock agreement and stock purchase agreement 

Note: Proximity search on Onna does not take into account the order of the words in a sentence. For example, near:credit,3,agreement and near:agreement,3,credit will return the same results as they're both looking for sentences with 'agreement' and 'credit' within three words, regardless of the order.


Looking for more ways to filter your searches in Onna? Check out our article on using filters for search

For searches where you can use boolean, wild card or search multiple terms with OR, check out our article on advanced search

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